The Great Escape

10653621_10101893479149479_4936584095703173115_n_editedBack in January, through something short of a miracle, we won a contest. The prize was a week long cabin stay at any Virginia State Park of our choice. We ended up choosing Natural Tunnel State Park and celebrated the anniversary of Charlie’s NICU discharge there last week. It was the vacation I hoped for and desired. So much so, that I’m bitter about being back.

My husband and I decided to disconnect from our lives. Other than using the visitor center’s wifi to upload pics and respond to a few tweets, we were out of contact. It was a marvelous escape.

I countered phone calls, emails, and text messages from doctor’s offices, therapists, and the like (whom can be surprisingly persistent over trivial matters) with the simple message “On vacation, will return on Saturday.” I did not have to answer questions from people such as, “Is she eating yet?” or “Isn’t she really small for two?” Nor, did I have to politely listen to unsolicited advice.

It was exceptionally quiet. I love quiet.

984177_10101885614994309_3831279311050384390_nThe area was extraordinarily beautiful and rich in history. The first few days we explored every inch of the park. Charlie went swimming, my husband went fishing, and I went hiking with our dog. We played on the playgrounds, rode the ski lift to the Natural Tunnel, and climbed up to Lover’s Leap. Charlie found a trail marker with a “2” on it and she stood over it saying, “Two, two, two, two, two…” We had to pull her away to finish the hike.

Later, we ventured over to nearby Wilderness Road State Park. We poked around the historic area with the fort and talked to the period actors. Charlie liked the blacksmith. She exclaimed “Whoa!” when the bellows blew sparks and said, “Ding!” each time he hammered. Wilderness Road had a really nice playground but Charlie preferred playing in the natural play area.

10605993_10101884004162429_5830653123281358990_nTowards the end of the week, we visited Southwest Virginia Museum State Park which was also near by. (For those who are counting, that makes 28 out of 36.) The museum was filled with artifacts from the area. Charlie liked the interactive exhibits. She repeatedly played the same track about spiritual music. Fortunately, we were the only ones touring the mansion at the time.

After the museum, we went to Bark Camp Lake. The lake was lovely. However, we did not get to stay long because Charlie had an issue. She would not let go of my leg and screamed, “Mommy, mommy, mommy!” We assumed she was just tired and headed back to the cabin for a nap. But, we realized later that her stomach was bothering her.

We wrapped up our week by riding the ski lift and revisiting the Natural Tunnel. We retraced our favorite sights and activities.

There were moments that don’t fit into this narrative such as rocking on the back porch while watching a quick down pour. Or, cooking out with friends (during the couple of nights they joined us) until late in the evening. And, gazing at the most stars I had ever seen each clear night.

10614411_10101893490037659_2810308428759719378_nAfter a week like that, I am fighting back tears now that we are home. It’s not so much being home that is upsetting because we live in another beautiful area of the state.

Instead, it’s the thought of returning to our normal. Back to arguing with insurance, back to navigating a confusing and overwhelmed medicaid waiver system, back to answering people’s questions about Charlie, back to patiently nodding at unsolicited advice, back to therapists making unrealistic home therapy suggestions, and back to sitting in countless doctors’ offices.

I live a strange polarity. I detest many of the things in my daily life. However, I wake up each morning so grateful for the life I have.

vac1


When Words Fail Her

I can only understand about 25% of what Charlie says. That is, if she says anything at all.

A lot of the time she grunts or “talks” with her mouth closed. Other times, it’s garbled gibberish. With context clues and effort, I can understand about 25% of what she says.

Tonight, my husband realized that all of those sounds have meaning and we can’t understand most of them.

Charlie was climbing on him and playing with a Little People’s tricycle. She rolled it up his arm, put it on his head, and exclaimed some garbled words. He dismissed them and continued flipping through the channels.

She repeated her gibberish over and over. He realized she was trying to tell him something. After asking her to repeat it a few more times, he deciphered she was actually saying, “It’s a hat!”

He was so impressed with her. But, at the same time, so saddened. He realized her thoughts and receptive language is fine. Her body (more so her mouth) will not do what she wants it to.

Although, I already knew this. It makes me sad as well when I think about it. I can’t imagine the level of frustration, isolation, and whatever else she may feel. I wish her fine motor skills were decent enough for sign language.

However, I try to remain positive and remind myself that she seems happy. The whole ordeal doesn’t really appear to bother her. She is one of the most joyful and enthusiastic people I know of.

Before she went to bed tonight, she said, “nigh” (good night) for the first time. Then, when I told her I loved her, she leaned in and kissed me.

I guess maybe she does communicate in her own way.

10603331_10101861563249199_6763186058705728329_n

We’ve been visiting Chuck E Cheese’s a lot lately. It’s an easy and fun way to work on most of her therapy goals.


All Quiet On The Royal Front

I haven’t had the urge to blog lately. I want to say it is due to lack of happenings. However, that’s not true. There is just as much occurring now as ever. Therefore, I think the change may be in me. Those big emotions are not stirred up on an almost daily basis. I may be settling into my normal.

Oh, insurance does not want to cover a medical necessity? I’m used to that. What’s that? The medicaid waiver process is a giant snafu? I kind of expected it. Are those people judging us as we go about our routine? Shrugged off. Another diagnosis? I saw it coming.

Don’t mistake me. Like anyone, some days are better than others for me. I do struggle from time to time. I continue to feel disconnected from the “regular” parenting world. But, those powerful consuming emotions are not an every day thing anymore. Maybe, more of a once or twice a week kind of thing.

The dust is finally settling after our world was rocked by Charlie’s premature arrival.

On a side note: Today was the first day that I looked at Charlie and saw a little girl instead of a baby. I don’t care what people say. This time did not fly by. It felt like the longest two years of my life.

I happily tossed out the bottles (she takes her formula through a sippy cup now). I was thrilled to take the rail off of her crib. I look forward to the (very far off) day without diapers.

Bye bye baby and hello little girl!

Taken earlier today.

Taken earlier today.


The Good, The Bad, And Charlie’s Hair Cut

The past week or so has been rather uneventful in our world. Nevertheless, there have been things to celebrate, things to curse, and well… Charlie’s odd hair cut.

The good things: First, the letter of medical necessity did the trick. Charlie’s insurance finally approved coverage of her formula. Second, this is the last week of my doxycycline prescription (which means I can safely endure sun exposure again in a few days). Finally, Charlie has been progressing forward in her skill set (most noticeably in gross motor skills).

The bad thing: The Medicaid waiver process was a nightmare that included lost files, lost applications, and an overworked social services office. But, it was nothing that an entire afternoon spent at the social services office couldn’t put back on track.

Charlie’s odd hair cut: Charlie does not like having her hair cut. She alternates between thrashing her head forward and backwards and shaking it side to side while saying “No, no, no, no!” I decided to just cut her hair at home after the first time she did this at the hair dresser and got a bad hair cut. For her last few haircuts, I cut her hair and it kind of worked.

Charlie’s dad wanted to see if he could do better. Even though I warned him, I don’t think he was expecting her dramatics. His first cut was a clump of bangs almost at the hair line. He was horrified. I laughed and reminded him that it will grow back.  Now, Charlie has extremely short bangs and will probably get professional haircuts from this point forward.

10516801_10101841657690099_6673137201984723772_n 10458551_10101841657695089_2865358064653152676_n

Charlie went to the county fair this week. She had her first frozen banana and played in a baby pool filled with corn.


Hello Elmo!

preemie hugsActivity two of the week completed! Yesterday, we made the pilgrimage to Busch Gardens so that Charlie could meet Elmo. The trip turned out to be everything I hoped it would be.

I was surprised there was so much for her to do. She saw the live show twice, met all the characters, rode several rides, played in a playground like area, and splashed on a splash pad type area.

There were a couple of moments I had to fight back tears. There are a couple of reasons why:

1) We are so fortunate Charlie is here to share in a day like yesterday (or any day) with us.

2)Charlie has worked and fought harder than I can possibly imagine. Nevertheless, she is full of joy, enthusiasm, and is almost always smiling. To see her have a day like yesterday was incredible.

It’s true, she probably won’t remember any of it. But, yesterday, her world was as magical as she makes my everyday.

Busch3

 


Charlie’s Big Girl Bed

It happened sooner in the week than I had planned. Yesterday turned out to be the big day. We took the front rail off of Charlie’s crib and transitioned her to a “big girl” bed. In addition, we moved everything out of her drawers into organizers in the closet as a preemptive strike on any “redecorating” by Charlie.

Late in the afternoon, her crib turned into this toddler bed.

10351526_10101824260389429_4793151973538176502_n edit

Charlie was thrilled to find Elmo covering a bed that she could easily climb into and out of. I’ve heard other mothers say they were sad when this day came. I can’t say that I share in the sentiment.

Our baby experience has been longer than average and exhausting. I feel relieved we reached this milestone. I am caught up in the excitement of a new bed for Charlie. Mostly, I find solace in moving one more step forward. We are inching closer to leaving all this behind.

 

 


Charlie’s Big Week Ahead

Charlie doesn’t know it but next week is a big week in her world.

First, we are taking her to see her favorite Sesame Street character, Elmo, at Busch Gardens. I wanted to take her to see Elmo since the weather warmed up. Things such as schedules and finances finally worked out so we can take her this upcoming week.

I would be lying if I said I wasn’t excited.

10386759_10101741421309609_7489998055083846864_n

Next, Charlie is being freed from her crib. I want to say she is moving to a big girl bed. In reality, she’s having the front rail taken off of her crib to make a toddler day bed.

Most of my friends have posted on Facebook the day their kid first climbed out of the crib. I planned on keeping Charlie in her crib until she reached that day.

However, Charlie keeps getting stuck in the bars of her crib as she tries to get out. Nap time is frequently interrupted by Charlie’s desperate cries for help. She finds new and inventive ways to become trapped.

A couple of times, I considered breaking a bar to free her. Charlie hasn’t realized that, try as she might, she will not escape the crib through the bars.

Part of me is a little sad that we don’t get to have that moment of when she does finally climb out of the crib. The sadness is short lived because my mind is busy figuring out the logistics of this change.

I have additional concerns on top of those concerning bedding and Charlie staying in bed. Her room, although currently childproof, will have to become Charlie proof. She likes to pull the clothes and diapers out of her drawers, dump the laundry basket, and carry out whatever other mischief she can invent. Her room will be rearranged.

Next week is a big week for Charlie. I can’t wait to see how it all plays out.

10552533_10101822132987759_2925008518101329650_n_edited

Charlie visited Sky Meadows State Park today and enjoyed the gorgeous weather.


The Follow Up

Charlie had her follow up appointment with the developmental clinic yesterday. Other than having to wake up before dawn, the day went pretty smoothly. Overall, it was uneventful. I’ll take it.

Her assessments didn’t discover any new issues. The doctor discussed his ongoing concerns. As Charlie grows older, it is becoming clearer that apraxia is at the root of her speech and feeding delay.

However, her speech delay doesn’t stop her from socializing.

Tonight, she was at the kick off of a March of Dimes March For Babies campaign. She enjoyed meeting the area’s team captains.

She also enjoyed exploring the grounds where the walk is going to be held.

10501926_10101819030180809_7672506443683042350_n 10486405_10101819030175819_1405145377177887853_n 10525754_10101819030160849_1431981825417667667_n 10563164_10101819130429909_8107552311280995594_n 10458821_10101819030170829_7567746562986444494_n

 


Specialty Clinic On The Horizon

On Wednesday, Charlie will make the two hour journey for her follow up appointments (she gets reassessed in several areas) with developmental pediatrics. I admit, I am a little nervous. The past couple of visits to the clinic did not go so well for us.

I realize we are lucky and Charlie is doing really well considering her extremely premature arrival. But, I can’t shake the feeling that we should be done with all this. I’m kind of like a little kid pouting and saying to myself, “We weren’t supposed to have this challenging of a journey.”

For some reason, it was easier for me to accept the long NICU stay than it is the long period it will take Charlie to “catch up”, if ever.

Sometimes, I think I should stop hoping for the end of specialty clinic visits, regular insurance phone calls, and numerous therapy appointments. Because I hope, each follow up with the developmental pediatrician feels how I imagine a prisoner must feel before a parole board. I see the progress Charlie has made and dare to think, “It won’t be long now until we are finished with this.”

However, my hopes are shot down when a new area of concern is discussed or limited progress is pointed out. Often, I knew of the issue beforehand. However, I had anticipated it wasn’t a big deal. Or, I assumed it could easily be addressed.

Additionally, I feel guilty and greedy for wanting more. We are fortunate Charlie is doing well. That should be enough. I feel selfish for desperately wanting her to “catch up”.

I am not sure what is going to happen on Wednesday. Maybe that is why I’m already anxious and thinking about it. I have my fingers crossed it’s going to be a good appointment.

10513354_10101809940007589_5033501280039906211_n 10500270_10101809940017569_6025134730848158920_n

Charlie visited Skyline Drive this weekend.

 


Charlie Stops For Nothing

Hectic is a good word to describe the past week. Over the course of the week, I’ve completed Charlie’s medicaid waiver forms, worked towards getting the insurance claim for the formula approved, and attended to Charlie’s usual busy schedule. Things were a little more difficult because I’ve been under the weather.

Despite the stress, I feel like there was much accomplished. Additionally, I decided to make some needed changes. Basically, I need to reapportion and move stuff around on my plate.

For the most part, the people in my world won’t notice the changes.  The biggest of which is that I’m cutting back on the frequency of my personal blog posts. I don’t feel the urge to post as often as in the past. Plus, I want to pursue to new interests and work on moving forward.

Of course, none of this matters to Charlie. She has been playful and active all week. I have no idea where this toddler gets her energy from.

10519502_10101806518953409_1099836487495248029_n_edited 10557471_10101806519252809_4657596336052934859_n


My Favorite Sound

Charlie joined me today as I picked through a clearance sale at the mall. She pretended she was looking for clothes and rifled through the racks beside me. After she became bored, she played peek a boo with anyone that looked her way.

A sales lady got sucked into a game of peek a boo with Charlie. As the laughter from both sides died down, the lady asked Charlie what her name was. Charlie smiled at the lady, fidgeted with her hair, squirmed, and remained silent. The pause in the conversation became uncomfortable. I jumped in and answered for Charlie.

The lady asked, “How old are you Charlie?” Charlie answered with babble. The lady looked somewhat surprised to hear a toddler babble. I disclosed, “She doesn’t talk yet.”

I’ve been cranky and exhausted from this past week.

I was too tired to explain Charlie’s early arrival. I didn’t have the patience to hear a stranger’s awkward remarks upon receiving the information. I was not in the mood to discuss diagnoses and how we hope she will one day “catch up”.

I just wanted to find some deeply discounted clothes and get out of there.

Speech, like feeding, is one of those skills that Charlie struggles with. The good news is that she is improving. While she continues to babble, Charlie now has twenty eight words.

Among those words are “hop” for help, “Melmo” for Elmo, bye-bye, eat, and happy. Sometimes when Charlie is having fun she repeats “Happy, happy, happy, happy, happy…” with a huge grin. I’m nearly brought to tears each time she does it.

However, Charlie started using my personal favorite word a few weeks ago… mommy.

Charlie learned to say her name a few weeks ago as well.


Hard At Work

I’ve had my hands full dealing with insurance companies, medicaid waivers, and doctor’s orders. Once I get everything figured out I will post what worked for us and what didn’t.

In the meantime, my distractions have not prevented Charlie from making the most of her summer.

10402685_10101793232354859_4773395389469493526_n 10313420_10101793232230109_8266399627852888316_n

10290639_10101793231761049_3526231677844760618_n chuck e


I Didn’t Realize It Was Miserable

Thanks to the Parker Lee Project, Charlie received her first case of her new formula yesterday. It has only been a day since Charlie started her new formula but, I’ve already noticed a huge difference. I didn’t realize how miserable feeding had been for us until today.

Charlie has been learning to eat solids for over a year with limited success. Until yesterday, her major source of nourishment was from a partially hydrolyzed whey protein infant formula.

However, this posed two problems that we (her daddy and I) were aware of. First, the formula tasted disgusting so we had to get creative about disguising the flavor. Second, there weren’t enough calories in infant formula to satiate Charlie.  The formula had to be fortified with pretty much any food that flowed through a cross cut nipple.

Honestly, we had no idea what we were doing. But, as long as she continued to grow and gain weight everyone seemed happy with the approach. We (her doctors, her daddy, and I) hoped the spit up, reflux, and vomiting was something she would outgrow.

Feeding had become a complex process of guesswork and mixing of formula with food substances that Charlie was coaxed to eat. She was good about it. Better than I would have been.

But, there was a lot of spit up and occasionally she would vomit for what seemed like no reason at all. We constantly reminded anyone who played with Charlie, “Careful, don’t make her throw up!” Her crib sheets needed to be changed, at least, every two days due to spit up stains. This was our normal.

After her evaluation at the feeding clinic, we learned that Charlie has difficulty with chewing, trouble coordinating the movement of food with swallowing, a sensitive gag reflex, slow gastric emptying, poor motility, and a casein allergy. The gastroenterologist prescribed a specialty formula (a fully hydrolyzed whey protein pediatric medical food with fiber).

There has been a noticeable difference only a day after the switch to the new (and more appropriate) formula.

While it smells gross, Charlie readily eats the new vanilla flavored formula. There is no mixing or convincing her to eat. Plus, she hasn’t spit up or vomited since the introduction of the new formula yesterday morning. Her reflux has improved significantly.

I had no idea how stressful and awful Charlie’s feeding and GI issues were until they improved. It wasn’t until I felt an overwhelming sense of relief when feeding Charlie this morning that I realized how bad things were. I feel somewhat guilty for not making the realization and insisting that the issue be addressed sooner.

As a side note, I would like to inform my readers about The Parker Lee Project. Through the amazing work of the organization, parents in need of medical supplies can apply for the supplies (if available) free of charge. I’m grateful The Parker Lee Project supplied us with thirty days of formula (almost $1000 worth) while we wait for the paperwork to be processed with insurance and the durable medical equipment provider.

Additionally, those who have extra medical supplies that a child has out grown or no longer requires can donate them to this organization. Financial contributions are also appreciated.

preemie feeding

Charlie golfed a little on the Fourth.

 

 


Happy Fourth of July!!!!

Happy Fourth of July! This is Charlie’s third Fourth of July celebration.

2012-07-04 1044170_10101166370396249_1902414363_n

10457845_10101783511096339_8083049919016220632_n_edited

 


The Power Of Photos

I’m one of those moms. I take a few minutes in the midst of the action to snap photos. Some people may find it annoying. Others, comment that I’m not really enjoying the moment if I’m busy taking pictures. To the former, I apologize and to the later, I beg to differ.

Photos are my way of capturing memories. You’ve probably noticed from my photos, I don’t worry about lining up the perfect shot or finding decent light. I pull out my cell phone in the moment and snap several pictures for a minute or two.

At least, one of those pictures will turn out. The memory of the day will live on with my memento.

bearcreeklakeFor example, when I see the picture on the left, I’m reminded of the first cool, crisp autumn day of last year. I remember how Charlie laughed at the sound the lake animals made as they splashed through the surface. The picture is a reminder of the ranger who paused with a surprised expression when he noticed our unusual approach to hiking. It was one of her last hikes in the infant seat attachment.

Similarly, I have countless photos that take me back to another time and place. Photos have the power to jog our memories of things that may otherwise be forgotten.

In the NICU, I wondered if it was “right” to take pictures. Did I want to remember my baby like this? Was it right to photograph a sick baby?

Day of BirthAt first, I took pictures because I wanted people to see my baby. We didn’t have many visitors and the pictures were a way to proudly announce her arrival.

Later, I started to take pictures for my scrap book (our NICU offered a scrap booking class). I’m so glad I took those pictures, for two reasons. Now, I can see how far she has come. And, if we had lost Charlie in the NICU, we would have had some pictures to remember her by.

What’s not in pictures can also be a reminder.

Unfortunately, there are only a couple of pictures of Charlie and I together in the NICU. There was no one to take them. It reminds me of what an incredibly lonely time it was.

I regret the pictures not taken.

So yes, I am one of those moms who snaps what may be too many pictures. However, the reason for the photos is not to “one up” my friends on Instagram or have the picture perfect life on Facebook. It’s because this is the only baby experience I will ever have and I want to remember every possible bit of it.

I took a lot of pictures at the fountain yesterday.

I took a lot of pictures at the fountain yesterday.

 

 


Wordless Wednesday

fountain2_edited_edited fountain8_edited

fountain6_edited  fountain3_edited


NICU Reunion: Take Two

10492524_10101775114538109_8279231079749444152_n (1)We did it! Today, Charlie and I attended our second annual NICU reunion. Despite my reservations, it was certainly easier the second time around.

Charlie and I arrived and said our initial hellos. Then, I grabbed a seat out in the courtyard under the shade of a tree and watched from the sidelines as Charlie wandered around close by.

There were several children’s activities available but Charlie chose to obsess over the storm drain in the center of the courtyard. She laughed and clapped as she walked back and forth over the drain. Eventually, she found the mulch more interesting and occupied the rest of her play time by tossing it in the air.

Afterwards, we saw Charlie’s primary nurse. It was tough but I stuck to my promise that I wouldn’t cry this year. We talked while the other nurses passed around Charlie and doted over her. Charlie flirted shamelessly.

My friend graciously supplied this picture (and permission) for this post.

My friend graciously supplied this picture (and permission for its use).

Today, had a very different feel.  The memories and emotions were not as intense. However, the hospital food was just as bad as I remember it.

It wasn’t long before we had enough and it was time to leave. My NICU mom friend and her daughter joined us for lunch afterwards at a near by restaurant.

Overall, I’m glad we attended this year’s reunion. Last year, I was still reeling from the relatively fresh news that Charlie had bigger issues than expected. This year, I’ve figured out how to roll with what is thrown at us. And Charlie… well, she’s never given up and it shows.

10514740_316519145173218_4729251133520160262_n_edited

 


NICU Reunion Ahead

This weekend is Charlie’s NICU reunion. I think it’s supposed to be a happy event. However, I have mixed emotions.

Last year’s reunion was the first one Charlie and I attended. To be honest, it was tough. The walk from the parking garage to the hospital conference center was like a walk through a dream. The sights, sounds, and smells stir up so many emotions that the whole thing becomes really overwhelming.

It’s difficult to see the babies that were sicker than Charlie who are now so much further ahead. It’s hard to bring back the baby, that everyone thought would catch up by two, with noticeable delays.

Why go back? Why put myself through this? There are many reasons.

Gratitude is one reason. Our attendance at the NICU reunion is a way of saying thanks to the people who saved my baby and helped me. It’s incredible to see Charlie’s primary NICU nurse.

Another reason is the other NICU parents. I want to see the other parents who were there with me for the majority of Charlie’s three months. I want to know they are well.

The final and most important reason: It’s for me. I’m not going to let the trauma trump me. Each time I go back is an opportunity to process things further. It’s a chance to move ahead in my attempt to leave the trauma of her NICU stay behind me.

Ready or not, here we go… again.

A mommy and me selfie taken today during backyard play.

A mommy and me selfie taken today during backyard play.


The Countdown Begins

Sometimes when I’m around other parents, I feel like a puzzle piece that doesn’t quite fit with the rest of the puzzle. We do have the shared experience of being parents. But, that’s where the similarities end.

I’ve lost my connection with the common parenting experience. I read things other parents sometimes write and I wonder, “Who are these people? How is it possible we live on the same planet, the same country, or even the same state?”

When I’m out running errands, I hear other mothers talk. Their concerns are nowhere close to mine. For example:

For me, vaccines didn’t feel like an option. After spending three months around very young children who were critically ill, it seemed foolish not to vaccinate.

I hate that I know about the Durable Medical Equipment part of a health insurance policy, where the closest pediatric emergency department is, and about epo injections.

I can’t help but think a newborn over five pounds is big.

I don’t want my child to learn to read before kindergarten, be fluent in Mandarin, or become a musical virtuoso. I just want my child to learn to talk. Maybe one day, she will be able to tell me she loves me back.

Toilet training is way ahead of my map. Due to circumstances, we will toilet train much later than most. For the record,  I don’t think that wipe warmers are frivolous when a baby has sensory issues.

I don’t worry about organics, GMOs, or junk food. I would be thrilled to see my child chew AND swallow a bite of anything.

These are only a few of the disconnects. Premature birth has shaken my world to its core. Since Charlie’s birth, there has been only one time and place that I felt like I fit completely into a puzzle. It was at last year’s March of Dimes ShareUnion.

This year’s ShareUnion is just around the corner (in 85 days). Let it be noted, my countdown has begun.

I look forward to spending time with other parents who understand and possibly live in my world. There will be no talk of the “right” way to do things or perfection. Instead, there is understanding and encouragement.

I can’t wait to be in Phoenix in September. I would even walk if I had to.

10492201_10101764465289289_2673190588722307109_n

 

 


Midnight Cleaning

I’m writing a very quick post tonight. Charlie went to bed early this evening. I’m taking advantage of the free time and cleaning the house.

The only reason I’m posting is because I promised someone I’d post new pictures tonight. These pics are from a recent playground session. Now back to cleaning…

10500431_10101768538935669_27304942938341359_n 10385468_10101768539065409_2478157015628940331_n

10376905_10101768539170199_3803935734023504324_n 10455854_10101768539344849_5722415193822752608_n


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 785 other followers

%d bloggers like this: